iPhone egrips saved my iPhone from my carelessness

This post isn’t about sex, but iPhone users have to read this because I totally got saved today by an innocuous piece of silicone. Here’s the story:

Recently Gizmodo reported on a guy who successfully used the Find My iPhone feature to – you guessed it – find his iPhone after it got stolen lost. This is my version except without awkward ethnic references that are later explained or major drama or anyone’s carelessness except my own.

Earlier today I picked a friend up at the airport, had a great lunch and then dropped her off at her house. On the way back I decided to stop at one of those DIY car cleaning places to vaccuum my car which had dirt and leaves from the various hikes I like to go on. I put my purse and keys on the dash, got out of my car, put my money in the vaccuum cleaner machine, my iPhone on the roof of my car, and started vaccuuming.

While I was bent over on the seat trying to vaccuum under the floor mats on the driver’s side, I had the eerie feeling that someone was watching. I turned around and, sure enough, some guy was on the other side spending a bit too much time fussing with his vaccuum cleaning (read: probably watching me bent over in my summer dress; let’s just hope he didn’t have his iPhone camera out).

In any case, I finished my cleaning, trying very hard to stay seated or otherwise appropriately placed in the front and back seat while cleaning. When my time ran out, I got back in the driver’s seat, got my purse and keys off the dash and drove off toward home. A few blocks down the road, I was at a stop light and reached for my iPhone. I couldn’t find it. It wasn’t in my purse or my dress pocket. Where could it be??? I looked on the dash, but it wasn’t there either. Then I remembered: I left my iPhone on the roof of the car! Visions of a cracked iPhone somewhere on the side of the road – or worse, driven over by a car – flashed before my eyes. What an idiot! How careless could I be?

Still stopped at the red light, I put my car in park, jumped out, stood up and – oh my gosh! – it was still on the roof of the car, glistening like a ray of hope. I approached it like Jennifer Aniston and Owen Wilson, in Marley & Me (such a sad movie) approached Marley when he held the beautiful gold necklace in his jaws, ready to swallow it at any second. I didn’t want the universe to swallow my iPhone like Marley swallowed the necklace. If the slightest breeze or shake of the car tipped my iPhone the wrong way, it would likely crack on the road.

I popped over to the other side, got it safely back in my hands, waved to the driver behind me (as the light was now green), and got back in my car. As slippery as iPhones are, it would never have survived a several block drive – especially as I am kind of a jumpy driver, I’ve been told – had it not been for my egrip. Earlier this spring, some friends who work for the Associated Press (AP) gave me a freebie egrip that was at their conference exhibit and I immediately placed it on the back of my phone. I always thought it was neat the way it kept my iPhone in place on my desk, but I never thought it would save my iPhone’s life.

Egrips are affordable and many companies now put their logos on them, like AP has, and give them out, according to the egrips site, so maybe you can see if your company can get some too. I am in no way paid by egrips or making any money off of them, I just honestly am so glad and excited that I had one on my iPhone today. Then again, maybe you will be less careless than I was today.

Pros:
+ Free (mine was) or at least affordable
+ Easy to apply and to remove
+ Stays in place if you don’t pick at it
++++ Potentially iPhone life saving

Cons:
- Nothing major, unless you prefer to only look at an unfettered solid black back of your iPhone.

About Dr. Debby Herbenick

Dr. Debby Herbenick

Dr. Debby Herbenick is a sex researcher at Indiana University, sexual health educator at The Kinsey Institute, columnist, and author of five books about sex and love. Learn more about her work at www.sexualhealth.indiana.edu.