politics

Recent posts

Texas Voter Laws Affect Women Disproportionately

As reported in Salon, a new voter ID law in Texas could disenfranchise up to one-third of women voters. Many voting-age women do not have an identification document that currently reflects their legal name (due to marriage, divorce, and so on). Additionally, photocopies are not accepted for the multi-step name-change process, making additional hurdles for women and transgender people – but not cis-gendered men. This makes me feel somewhat cynical, as Texas already doesn’t have the greatest record of looking out for its female citizens. Ideally everyone, regardless of gender identity, would have access to facilities to easily change their names, marital status, sex, and so on – or if that access is restricted, it shouldn’t affect their ability to do vital things like vote. Continue Reading →

Advances In Women’s Health Politics (Plus Ninjas Against Rape)

If you have the time to read it, I highly highly highly recommend checking out Echo Zen’s Feministe post “How Women’s Health and Social Media Won 2012: Retrospective.” This link-rich essay describes the political events of 2012 in relation to women’s health, the amazing role of social media, and the rise of feminist advocacy by everyday women. Zen points out that what the social media strategies of 2012 exposed is “the violent rhetoric that once came from GOP quarters about how women’s healthcare isn’t real healthcare, since only sluts and prostitutes need contraception and family planning. If the extremists have learned anything from this cycle, it’s that openly campaigning against women’s lives is no longer a winning strategy, just as relying entirely on the white Christian vote is no longer a viable tactic.” This underlines how politicized an issue women’s health has become. Continue Reading →

Larger Social Implications Of The 2012 Elections

If you check out my run-down on gender, sex, and sexuality topics that came up in the 2012 U.S. elections, there are a slew of significant things happening: women, sexual, and religious minorities are being represented greater numbers than ever before in elected positions. Male politicians who make ignorant or disparaging comments about rape (a.k.a. “Republican Rape Philosophers”) are not winning their campaigns. And so on. There are, however, a number of subtler changes that also impact sexual health – which is, no matter how you slice it, a public health issue. Continue Reading →

2012 Election Results: Gay and Lesbian Issues

In terms of gay rights, the 2012 election showed significant progress. In three states – Maryland, Maine, and Washington – citizens voted to allow gay marriage. Minnesota lagged a little behind, voting against a ban on gay marriage (which is not quite the same thing as legalizing it), but hey, progress is progress. Additionally, Tammy Baldwin is the first openly lesbian senator to serve in U.S. history, and Kyrsten Sinema is the first openly bi member of Congress. Hopefully more will follow in their footsteps. Continue Reading →