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Science, Gender, And Needlepoint

As a folklorist, one of the areas of human existence I study is material culture. We talk about material culture as culture made material: literally, the objects created by humans that display facets of culture, belief, and worldview. Sometimes we’re interested in the material culture of the present, ranging from handmade works like pottery to re-purposed mass-made objects like scrapbooks or quilts. Like archaeologists, we look at objects of the past, too. Folklore intersects with sex in many ways, and material culture is no exception. Continue Reading →