Gender

Recent posts

Media Misrepresentation – Where Are The Boys?

I recently introduced the 2011 documentary Miss Representation to the 12th grade Health and Wellness class I teach. The film touches upon (well, hammers, really) some themes that are near and dear to my young feminist heart: objectification, media representation, gender stereotypes, and the like. As I expected, they ate it up. Each new disturbing infographic that flashed over the screen garnered a heavier sigh, a snarkier chortle. And with good reason. Continue Reading →

Call Of (Female) Duty

I won’t claim to be anywhere near an expert player of Call Of Duty (now Tetris is another story – I have yet to have a friend beat me at that). However, a few of my friends are huge fans of the game, and as such I’ve learned a little bit about it. I like that you can customize some of your weapons (I love the cherry blossom print guns), but did wonder why there are only minimal options for the soldiers themselves? One problem I had with the soldier options were that they were all male – but that’s soon going to change! When the latest version is released this month (Call of Duty Ghosts) players will have the option to choose the gender of their soldier. Continue Reading →

Pickup Artistry In Denmark

We reviewed Clarisse Thorn’s book on pickup artists here on MSP a while back, and based on that look at the “culture” of pickup artistry, it’s intriguing to note that it doesn’t go over so well in Denmark. According to this account of a frustrated pickup artist’s visit, Danish women aren’t receptive to pickup artistry because… socialism? Apparently Danish women don’t put any energy into learning to please men “because the government will take care of her and her cats, whether she is successful at dating or not.” It’s interesting to consider that certain courtship techniques might succeed or fail based on how the rest of the social system treats individuals. Continue Reading →

Gender Roles And Sexual Roles

In one of my posts in the informed consent series I wrote, I explained the idea behind the Zimbardo prison experiment: that in a normal population of college students, roles were randomly assigned so that some students became prison guards, and others became prisoners. The guards quickly began acting abusive, as though the roles became their identities. I was discussing this experiment with a friend in the BDSM scene, and she pointed out that maybe the same thing is happening with American gender roles and sexuality. That is, because so many men are conditioned to become aggressive and forceful, this could be one reason why there is both anecdotal evidence and statistical evidence for there being many more men than women who prefer the dominant role in sexual encounters. If mainstream society is molding men to express their sexuality (indeed, their overall identities) in terms of acquisition, conquest, and violence, then perhaps that also accounts for the sexual roles that many men prefer. Continue Reading →

My Name is Strong: Raising Awareness About Gender-Based Violence Through Art

I was made aware of a creative new anti-violence initiative and awareness campaign called My Name Is Strong through a volunteer job. The description instantly caught my attention: “our commitment is to turn a single room into an overpowering exhibit of human strength.” My Name Is Strong aims to empower all individuals who have been impacted by gender-based violence through creative expression. The campaign isn’t just for survivors, but anyone who has been impacted by rape, harassment, sexual assault, etc. My Name Is Strong is based out of St Louis, Missouri and you can view submissions on their Facebook page. Continue Reading →

Unconscious Gender Bias Among Academics

While we may tend to think that educated and open-minded people are less likely to hold unconscious biases, a study by Yale found that scientists responded to the gender of names assigned to CVs as much as a control group did. They judged the men to be more competent candidates and deserving of higher pay. The female as well as male scientists made these assessments, demonstrating that both genders have internalized gendered values. Hopefully openly discussing the prevalence of gender bias will make people more aware of its influence on them. Follow us on Twitter @mysexprofessor. Continue Reading →

Why “They” and “Them” Will Never Work

I’m all about gender-neutral pronouns. The English language, once again, fails us when it comes to those that don’t fit within the norm (see my post on the limits of the English language for reference). Like many languages, English pretty much only allows us two options for singular gendered pronouns: he/him/his and she/her/hers. Those within the queer community (and allies/supporters) have been subverting these language norms for years. In fact, it’s been happening for a lot longer than I thought! Continue Reading →

Larger Social Implications Of The 2012 Elections

If you check out my run-down on gender, sex, and sexuality topics that came up in the 2012 U.S. elections, there are a slew of significant things happening: women, sexual, and religious minorities are being represented greater numbers than ever before in elected positions. Male politicians who make ignorant or disparaging comments about rape (a.k.a. “Republican Rape Philosophers”) are not winning their campaigns. And so on. There are, however, a number of subtler changes that also impact sexual health – which is, no matter how you slice it, a public health issue. Continue Reading →

Gendered Micro-Inequities In Academia

Ah, the start of another school year! I love the beginning of the semester because it’s always an invigorating time. I’m excited to be teaching an introduction to folklore class, which means I get to view my beloved discipline through new eyes. However, this is also a time to reflect on and take stock of what it means to be an academic. And for women, people of color, and other minorities, this can be an unsettling topic. Continue Reading →