discrimination

Recent posts

Sexuality and Tenure

An assistant professor at Indiana University Northwest reports that she has been denied tenure because she is out as a lesbian. Her publishing record is excellent, and thus she suspects discrimination. This isn’t surprising, given how we’ve seen transgender professors denied tenure. I don’t think it’s fair to ask academics with non-mainstream gender/sexual identities to remain closeted. But that’s essentially what these actions are doing: enforcing a heteronormative ban on behavior that is different. Continue Reading →

Want To Donate Blood? Make Sure You Don’t Look Gay.

Blood banks in the US will not accept blood from men who’ve had sex with men in order to try to prevent the spread of HIV and AIDS (despite the fact that the blood is tested before it officially can be used). Not only does this practice prevent potential donors from giving blood, it also allows for arbitrary and idiotic discrimination, as in this case of an Indiana man who was rejected because he “seemed” to be gay. This discriminatory policy costs hospitals healthy blood, and individuals their dignity: regardless of one’s sexuality, to have one’s appearance used against you is wrong. Follow us on Twitter @mysexprofessor. Follow Jeana, the author of this post, @foxyfolklorist. Continue Reading →

Sex Discrimination In The Newsroom

I’ve been recently working on a piece for a war and terrorism class pertaining to women reporters and overseas affairs, and I thought MSP would be a good outlet to share some of the info and get your reaction. As the news has well informed us, back on February 11th, CBS news correspondent Lara Logan was attacked at Tahrir Square in Egypt by an outraged mob of Egyptians. We later learned that Logan was sexually assaulted and beaten in the midst of the attack, being rescued soon after by a group of women as well as (an estimated) 20 Egyptian soldiers. Once word broke of the attack, stories were popping up left and right about her assault, yet not all were informative. Many blogs* were posting stories* spewing the typical (negative) rape responses, such as “she was asking for it,” or “she should have known better and not put herself in that position.” Continue Reading →