How To Make Using Condoms More Fun and Sexy

It’s been proven over and over again that condoms offer a great line of protection against pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STI). Many people still aren’t a fan of condoms, for a multitude of reasons – they don’t like how they feel, they trust their partner (so therefore don’t “need” condoms), they don’t think that they’ll get pregnant/contract an infection, they don’t have one handy, etc. I’ve also heard that the time it takes to grab a condom and put it detracts from what is going on.

I know from teaching that many students explain that condoms aren’t “necessary” for them as their big concern is preventing pregnancy, and there are many options out there that may be perceived as better. I can understand skipping certain condoms if you have a latex allergy or sensitivity (but opting for other non-latex condoms), but there are many ways to make condoms and dental dams fun to incorporate into your sex life. First, let’s talk about if you don’t like how they feel. There are more than just latex condoms out there, and some condoms are available in “thin” versions (try Proper Attire Sheer Condoms or Trojan Ultrathin). If you want to check out some non-latex condoms, the female condom might be worth a shot; the FC2 is made out of nitrile, the same material that many medical gloves are now made out of (at the doctor’s office I go to, they’re the blue gloves) and the same company makes the FC (again, a female condom) which is made from polyurethane.

Some other good options for non-latex condoms include Durex Avanti (sold at many mass merchandisers and made from polyurethane, and also bill themselves as being wider than most condoms), Lifestyles Skyn (made from polyisoprene), Trojan Non-Latex (another one made from polyurethane), and Kling-Tite Naturalamb (obviously not for everyone, as they’re made from lambskin, so these condoms are not recommended for STI prevention). Some people also find that they are able to get increased sensation from adding a few drops of lubricant to both the inside and outside of the condom. Just remember if you add any lube and are using latex condoms, to make sure that the lubricant is oil free (oil based lubricants can break down latex condoms).

While I do not recommend flavored condoms for vaginal intercourse or vaginal play because they may put some women at increased risk of yeast infections and some varieties are sold as a novelty product (check the package or wrapping to make sure it offers STI protection), flavored condoms can be a good choice for oral sex. Plus, having a new condom can add an unexpected element to sexual play (is it too much of a pun to put a banana flavored condom on your, ahem, banana? If so, opt for chocolate, vanilla, cola, or even strawberry!).

Latex (or non-latex) gloves can be easily used for oral sex, especially cunnilingus. Simply take a glove and cut it open with a pair of scissors – cheaper than most dental dams I’ve run across and comes in many different materials. In a pinch, plastic wrap is better than nothing.

Next, there are ways to use protection without taking away from the moment. It’s important to keep condoms nearby and where you will be able to remember to use them. Putting on a condom with your mouth can be a great way to keep the mood sexy and protect yourself and your partner. Here’s a great and easy to follow guide if this sounds like something you want to give a shot. You want to be careful that you don’t tear or puncture the condom in any way, such as with your teeth. If you can’t apply the condom all the way to the end, you can always add in your hand to smooth it out. Also, make sure that whether you opt to put on a condom with your mouth or hands, you do it before any penetration takes place (although pre-ejaculatory fluids don’t contain sperm in them, they can pass along infection and, in some cases, may pick up leftover sperm – important to note whether you are trying to avoid pregnancy or STIs).

Even before things start to heat up, letting your partner see you grab a condom or dental dam (or even if you’re out at dinner, slipping one into their hand or bag) can even be its own little turn-on in and of itself. Putting on a condom with your hands can even be done while kissing your partner, that way the moment can still be romantic and sexy.

Many people tell me that they skip condoms for oral and anal sex because they know that these acts can’t cause pregnancy. While it’s true that these acts don’t typically cause pregnancy, the semen can end up other places and that can cause pregnancy (for example, if a woman performs oral sex on a man and semen gets on her hands, and then she touches her own genitals with her semen-soaked hands). Also, these acts can cause sexually transmitted infections. With anal sex especially, the anus and rectum are more prone to tearing and that can cause an increased risk for STIs.

There are so many different types of condoms out there – ribbed, different colors, different flavors, and different materials. Several adult stores located near me have single condoms available for sale so you can easily try one of each and not break the bank. Next time you are in the market for some new condoms, you can even try spending a weekend indoors and rate some new condoms.

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About Holly Moyseenko

Holly Moyseenko is a sex educator living in Ohio. She is an advocate of positive and healthy sexuality. Holly currently works for a non-profit health organization as a health educator, and also teaches workshops that focus on many topics within the realm of healthy sexuality. In her spare time, she also is an advocate for survivors of sexual assault, gardens, reads anything within reach, drinks copious amounts of tea, and naps with her two dogs.