Reminders About Rape Prevention

Part of the point of openly talking about rape culture is that it is so pervasive that it can blind us to logic, and that needs to change. Take, for instance, this blog post on rape prevention, which notes:

If owning a gun and knowing how to use it worked, the military would be the safest place for a woman. It’s not.

If women covering up their bodies worked, Afghanistan would have a lower rate of sexual assault than Polynesia. It doesn’t.

If not drinking alcohol worked, children would not be raped. They are.

These are logical fallacies promoted by rape culture, which we must challenge and debunk in order to have a progressive and effective conversation about sexual assault.

About Jeana

Jeana

Jeana Jorgensen, PhD recently completed her doctoral degree in folklore and gender studies at Indiana University. She studies fairy tales and other narratives, dance, body art, feminist theory, digital humanities, and gender identity.